Arbi-Table Talk with Professor Imre Szalai

Please join us on May 13, 2021 at 10am Pacific / 1pm Eastern for a one hour special Arbi-Table Talk with Professor Imre Szalai and Professor Amy Schmitz.

This event is open only to Arbitrate.com basic, premium and featured members — if you are in those groups, look for an email just before the event with access information; if you’re not, please join us at https://arbitrate.com/membership to ensure you get the invitation.

This talk will explore the allocation of authority between courts and arbitrators under the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA).  More specifically, the talk will examine ongoing controversies and several splits among lower courts regarding delegation and arbitrability determinations in light of the FAA’s history, text, and policy. These splits raise deeper questions about the meaning of the FAA and how the FAA should be interpreted.

This should be a great conversation, and we hope to see you there.

About Prof. Imre Szalai

Professor Szalai graduated from Yale University, double majoring in Economics and Classical Civilizations, and he received his law degree from Columbia University, where he was named a Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar.

After graduating from law school, Professor Szalai practiced antitrust law in New York City, and then he practiced complex commercial litigation in Miami, Florida, representing clients in cases in various jurisdictions.

Professor Szalai is a nationally-known scholar regarding the Federal Arbitration Act, and his teaching interests and scholarship focus on arbitration, civil procedure, and dispute resolution.  His scholarship, which has been published in leading journals regarding dispute resolution, has been cited in briefs filed in the United States Supreme Court and other federal and state courts in cases involving the Federal Arbitration Act.

Professor Szalai wrote a leading book about the enactment and development of modern arbitration laws, Outsourcing Justice: The Rise of Modern Arbitration Laws in America. Professor Szalai’s book, which draws on previously untapped archival sources, explores the many different people, institutions, forces, beliefs, and events that led to the enactment of modern arbitration laws during the 1920s, and this book examines why America’s arbitration laws radically changed during this period.  By examining the history of modern arbitration laws and the original intent behind these laws, this book demonstrates how the U.S. Supreme Court has grossly misconstrued these laws.

Professor Szalai has also presented written testimony to Congress regarding arbitration law.  In connection with litigation, he has written several amicus briefs and served as an expert regarding arbitration issues, and he has been interviewed and quoted in national media regarding arbitration.  Professor Szalai also serves as an arbitrator in commercial cases.

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