Massachusetts Court Holds Uber’s Registration Process Did Not Give Reasonable Notice of Arbitration

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in Kauders v. Uber Technologies, Inc., No. SCJ-12883 recently held that Uber’s notification of its “terms and conditions” during the registration process for its app did not provide “reasonable notice” to its users of Uber’s terms. The Court found that consequently there was no valid contract between Uber and the users who had initiated legal remedies against it and that the arbitration proceedings which had taken place were improper.

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